RemoteFX Raises the Bar

One of the Hottest Virtualization Trends is the Virtual Desktop Infrastructure.

In VDI, user’s desktops exist as virtual machines (VMs) that are hosted on a network server. Users connect to these VMs using a thin-client component placed on their desktops.

Some of VDI’s major benefits include: Centralized desktop management, Rapid client deployment, Improved security, Lower support costs, The ability to purchase lower-cost desktops or “dumb” terminals, Extended useful lifespan for desktop hardware.

As the IT community begins to realize all of these benefits, VDI vendors continue to battle for market dominance. And alliances are being formed to help certain companies get an edge over others.

Microsoft recognized the need to enhance its ubiquitous Remote Deskstop Protocol (RDP) and in 2010 announced RemoteFX.  This quantum leap in Microsoft remoting protocols leverages the power of virtualized graphics resources and advanced codecs to recreate the fidelity of hardware-assisted graphics acceleration, including support for 3D content and Windows Aero, on a remote user’s device. This allows for a local-like, remote experience from Windows Server 2008 R2 Remote Desktop Services.  In addition to those experiences, they also announced RemoteFX will have generic USB redirection.  This will allow you to redirect virtually any USB device transparently over RDP.

USB redirection Provides Several Benefits:

  • Support for more devices than previously
  • Support for USB devices with thin clients
  • No client drivers necessary
  • Applications are transparent to redirected devices

Keeping in mind the availability of advanced VDI and remote display approaches from companies such as Citrix, VMware and others, Microsoft RemoteFX raises the bar but also adds to the need for a thorough and clear desktop strategy, especially for organizations looking to move to Server 2008 SP1.

You can also read the Dell Blog about Dell Desktop Solutions with RemoteFX

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